Some of the earlier fatalities were buried at Beechey Island near the original wreck and their frozen remains were discovered exceptionally well preserved in the 1980s. Could these be survivors of the Franklin Expedition? 'We were surprised by the results for those samples because in planning the analysis it hadn't occurred to us that there might have been women onboard,' study lead author Dr Douglas Stenton told Live Science. When Sir Leopold McClintock returned from King William Land in 1859, he stated that none of Sir John Franklin's officers and men could still be living, and the principal Arctic authorities entirely agreed with him. An illustration shows the ill-fated expedition of HMS Erebus and HMS Terror through the Northwest Passage. The book also stresses the scientific programme of this expedition (mainly observations of magnetism) and stresses the fact that previous big-ship expeditions had few casualties. By spring 1848, the ships were still beset, the men were approaching the … cit., pp. Part four: “Cabined, cribbed, confined“ In part four, Robert introduces the reader to the many dashing heroes, old rogues and bright young stars who … 276, 331–334, 340. For botulism to occur, there must be several conditions. Sir John Franklin's Lost Expedition Saturday, January 13, 2018 Accounting For The 105 Survivors An estimated 59 Franklin crewmen can be accounted for by counting all known sites except Terror Bay and Starvation Cove. This data will be updated every 24 hours. Letter in the New York Herald, 4 July 1880; Smith, D. M.. Arctic Expeditions, Edinburgh, 1877, p. 651Google Scholar; Dr Rae. The Private Journal of Capt. Journal of a Second Voyage for the Discovery of a North-West Passage, London, 1824, p. 198Google Scholar. We use cookies to distinguish you from other users and to provide you with a better experience on our websites. cit. September, 3, 1851. xxii, 397–407, 409, footnote on p. 412, 415–417. Feature Flags: { The remains were reported as having been identified as a European of the period of the Franklin expedition and probably those of a Franklin crewman (Walsh, Reference Walsh 1974, p. 24). John Franklin (pictured) was a British Royal Navy officer and explorer of the Arctic. He led the expedition to search for the fabled Northwest Passage, which ended in disaster, HMS Erebus and HMS Terror were sent out in the summer of 1845 to find the Northwest Passage but they took a crucial wrong turn and ended up stranded and surrounded by pack ice. Terror, disappeared with all their crew while searching for the Northwest Passage. Letter in the New York Herald, loc. The dramatic rescue of the survivors vindicated their actions. 416–425.Google Scholar. January 20, 1854: Franklin’s Expedition is missing for more than eight years. Lead poisoning was bad enough but environmental factors played a major role as well, during the events of the doomed expedition the weather was a lot colder than usual leaving the crew unequipped for the sub-zero temperatures and … Part three: Silent for four long winters. The stories told by the survivors thrilled the public, and Franklin became a national hero. Very few found … The tale of a handful of scurvy stricken men trying to sail out of danger is similar to some evidence of the Franklin expedition's end. Three graves have been found, and now almost all of the 1850-51 search ships are at Beechey Island, desperately looking for clues that will unravel the mystery. 21 J. E. Nourse. }. cit., footnote, p. 296. In one case, hunters came across two Franklin Expedition survivors who had been sleeping for days in the hollowed-out corpses of seals. The wreck of the HMS Terror, which has been well preserved in the icy waters off Canada's King William Island. Rescue expeditions turned up tantalizing clues: A trio of graves at one site. Different writers spell the name in different ways— “Aglugga, Agglugga, Agloocar”, etc. Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, London, 1835, p. 262.Google Scholar, 8 SirBelcher, Edward. To their surprise, they discovered that four of the crew were women - a finding that goes against previous reports suggesting an all-male trip. Muster Rolls of H.M.SS. op. But the crew was condemned to an icy death after their two ships got jammed in thick sea ice in the Canadian Arctic in 1846. 6 Parliamentary Paper, Instructions to Captain Sir John Franklin, London, 1848, pp. pp. 199–268.Google Scholar. Recently I´ve found a reference about what could have been the last message sent by one of the last survivors of the Franklin expedition. The expedition, consisting of two ships led by British Royal Navy captain Sir John Franklin, aimed to find a sea route linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. N. Lat. Nevertheless, a dissentient voice was raised in the United States by Captain Charles Francis Hall. 308, 624, 625, and chart opp. The expedition made use of both the Hudson&'s Bay Company and the North West Company. In recognition of his services, he was knighted, and elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1865. cit., 1824, pp. op. This is the 4:3 aspect ratio version. The wreck of H.M.S. 1 SirMcClintock, F. Leopold. Kamookak, the Netsilik historian who spent much of his life searching for the remains of the Franklin Expedition, is a prominent example. Munk's expedition gives some insight into what life might have been like for the very last Franklin survivors. There were later, unverified Inuit reports that between 1852 and 1858 Crozier and one other expedition member were seen in the Baker Lake area, about 400 km (250 mi) to the south, where in 1948 Farley Mowat found "a very ancient cairn, not of … First broadcast in 1988. "clr": true, 30 J. E. Nourse. Drinking just two cups of Chinese oolong tea a day can help your body burn fat while you sleep, study claims. * Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 10th January 2021. We are no longer accepting comments on this article. The remains are remarkably well-preserved because of the region's sub-zero temperatures. Until recently there was no pathological evidence that cannibalism occured on the Franklin Expedition. Schwatka's Expedition May 1879 Along Hayes River, approximately 15 miles East from the mouth of Back’s River. With no news of the expedition, his wife Lady Franklin urged the Royal Navy to send a rescue mission but they were confident he was still alive … G. F. Lyon, London, 1824, pp. Terror, one of the long lost ships from Sir John Franklin’s 1845 expedition to find the Northwest Passage, is astonishingly … Not until he himself had visited King William Land in 1869 did he realise that he had been too sanguine. Franklin is also the subject of a biography by Sir John … Stray Leaves from an Arctic Journal, new edition, London, 1865, p. 288.Google Scholar. op. But the crew was condemned to an icy death after their two ships got jammed in thick sea ice in the Canadian Arctic in 1846. Much of what remains are the Franklin expedition mummies, preserved for more than 140 years in the ice, belonging to crewmen like John Torrington. 'Some of these women were smuggled onboard [the] ship, and others disguised themselves as men and worked alongside the crew for months or years before being detected or intentionally revealing themselves to be female,' the authors wrote in their paper. 64, 65, 107–109, 589, 591–594. View all Google Scholar citations Scientists have taken the DNA from the skeletal remains of several sailors who died after getting stuck in Arctic ice on a doomed 1845 expedition. Several artefacts from the HMS Erebus have been discovered, including a bell and a tunic with buttons, have been recovered since the ship's wreck was found in 2014. 410, 412.Google Scholar, 24 This was mentioned in McClintock's book, The Voyage of the “Fox”, which Hall had with him. "relatedCommentaries": true, cit. This is the 4:3 aspect ratio version. 5 Sir James Clark Ross, with H.M. The Franklin expedition was a failed attempt by the Royal Navy to chart the remaining undiscovered section of the Northwest Passage.The expedition, initially consisting of 133 men on board the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, departed from Greenhithe, England in 1845 under the command of Sir John Franklin and was last seen by European whalers waiting in Baffin Bay for good conditions to enter the … 25 J. E. Nourse. } Then a person must can or process the foods in some way that removes air, but does not use enough heat to destroy the spores. 12 Rae, J.. cit., pp. The sailors died during the disastrous Franklin Expedition in which two vessels vanished along with all 129 people on board. 346, 547. In ... King William Island, and the northern coast of the Canadian mainland, but no survivors. Information about the artefacts found in the grave is limited (three cloth-covered metal buttons, one pearl button, and unidentified fragments of cloth), but a photograph of the skeletal remains was published and it … Ships Enterprise and Investigator, reached Port Leopold on 11 September 1848. 30, 31.Google Scholar, 7 SirParry, W. Edward. 108, 131, and “Report, etc.”, loc. Ships' location. The Voyage of the “Fox” in the Arctic Seas, 5th edition, London, 1881, p. 51.Google Scholar, 2 Nourse, J. E.. The Franklin expedition set sail in May 1845 in search of the Northwest Passage, ... Franklin and 24 men had died and the survivors were walking hundreds of kilometres south to a … The ship's wheel (left) can be clearly seen despite being covered by barnacles and other sealife. Officers left a note stating their plan to trek to the Back River. Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views. He spent the first winter near Wager River, and the other four winters at Repulse Bay, and made many journeys from his winter quarters. (1st edition, London, 1859, p. for this article. That later message explained that Franklin had died within the first year of the ships becoming stuck, along with 23 of the men, and that the expedition's 105 survivors … Ultimately, all perished, succumbing to starvation, possibly scurvy, possibly lead poisoning and possibly other diseases. Lead poisoning was bad enough but environmental factors played a major role as well, during the events of the doomed expedition the weather was a lot colder than usual leaving the crew unequipped for the sub-zero temperatures and … The detached ship's bell of HMS Erebus as found on the deck next to the windlass (a kind of winch positioned near the bow) last year. And the team hope to one day identify the sailors and uncover exactly what happened in their final few months. The message indicated that Franklin had died on June 11, 1847,and that 23 crew members had also died, and that the remaining survivors were deserting the ships. Russell Taichman holds a book detailing the 1864 Hall Arctic Expedition. cit., “Appendix”, “Meteorology”. Two months later's the ship's bell was recovered from the wreckage. Using the higher estimates yields a slightly unrealistic total of 109 considering 105 survivors were stated to be alive at Crozier's Landing on April 25, 1848. 339, 340, 341, 596–605. The disappearance of the Franklin expedition set off a massive search effort in the Arctic. Whether or not the remaining survivors travelled beyond this point is unknown (Woodman, 1991:276). 14 The Letter to the New York Herald was published on 4 July 1880. While the results could simply be false identifications due to the age of the DNA, the researchers noted that women sometimes served in disguise in the Royal Navy. I have read many, many books and articles about Franklin's last expedition. How the Discovery of Two Lost Ships Solved an Arctic Mystery Moreover, the disease can cause dehydration and the inability to gain weight, which could have contributed to the emaciated look of the Franklin Expedition survivors, in addition to starvation. cit., 1850, pp. Narrative of an Expedition to the Shores of the Arctic Sea, London, 1850, maps.Google Scholar. cit., 1824, pp. Now known as the lost Franklin expedition, this tragic journey ended in an Arctic shipwreck that left no survivors. Close this message to accept cookies or find out how to manage your cookie settings. 1847–1880: More than 30 expeditions sailed, steamed or sledged into the Arctic from the east, west and south. )Google Scholar. But the crew was condemned to an icy death after their two ships got jammed in thick sea ice in the Canadian Arctic in 1846. Dr Rae's letter in Household Words, London, 23 Dec. 1854, and his “Report to the Hudson's Bay Company”, ibid., 3 Feb. 1855. A message which crossed the North Atlantic ocean in a month. 9 J. E. Nourse. A 1848 notation on the same paper, by Captains Francis Crozier and James Fitzjames, informs readers that Franklin died in 1847 and that his was among the two dozen deaths that occurred before the survivors abandoned the ships and started walking south. Parks Canada has released the first pictures from inside the HMS Terror, one of the two ships in the doomed Franklin Expedition. The message only said the following: "Erebus, 112 W, Long, 71 deg. In 1845, Sir John Franklin led two British Royal Navy ships on an ill-fated expedition through the Northwest Passage—a famous and hazardous corridor connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. A Royal Navy officer and experienced explorer, Franklin had served on three previous Arctic expeditions, the latter two as commanding officer. McClintock provided the first survey of the west coast of King William's Land. 1847–1880: More than 30 expeditions sailed, steamed or sledged into the Arctic from the east, west and south. "lang": "en" 32 Dr Rae. 11 J. E. Nourse. The expedition, consisting of two ships led by British Royal Navy captain Sir John Franklin, aimed to find a sea route linking the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. His first expedition, to Frobisher Bay (1860–62), yielded no relevant information, and need not be described. cit. Very few found … Recently I´ve found a reference about what could have been the last message sent by one of the last survivors of the Franklin expedition. The expedition of Sir John Franklin met a similar end in the 1840s. In 1859, one of Lady Jane’s explorers found the only surviving account of the Franklin Expedition sealed in a tin can under a stone cairn on King William Island. 4 Osborn, S.. They left the two vessels, the HMS Erebus and HMS Terror, north of King William Island and set out on a harsh journey south toward a mainland trading post. 20 J. Rae. Captain Hall and the so-called Survivors of the Franklin... https://doi.org/10.1017/S0032247400041723. See also Gilder, W. H.. Schwatka's Search, London, 1881, p. 91Google Scholar. op. 34 Sir John Ross. Possibilities included the lead solder used to seal the expedition's food tins, other food containers lined with lead foil, food colouring, tobacco products, pewtertableware, and l… January 20, 1854: Franklin’s Expedition is missing for more than eight years. Part three: Silent for four long winters. Officers left a note stating their plan to trek to the Back River. Not until he himself had visited King William Land in … This is a reference to the Inuit meeting Franklin survivors at Washington Bay on the South shore of King William Island. Judging by the bodies found so far, none of the remaining crew made it even a fifth of the way to safety. The first evidence surfaced in 1981 when Dr. Owen Beattie discovered cut marks on a femur recovered from a Franklin Site on King William Island. THEY ABANDONED SHIP. op. 10 Nourse stated that the latitude was 69° 47′ 5″ N., but this does not agree with the map (p. 346) and was the latitude of Encampment Bay, op. Not until he himself had visited King William Land in 1869 did he realise that he had been too sanguine. In total, the process identified 24 individuals from the crew, while laying the groundwork for a genetic database for Franklin research. DNA from 37 bone and tooth samples found at eight sites around King William Island were found to belong to 24 different crew members. Scientists have begun to make ground over the past 25 years, discovering several of the Franklin Expedition sailors in boats and campsites scattered along the route. All 129 crew members died. This image shows the mummified remains of one of the expedition's doomed crew members. The stories told him by Eskimos convinced him at first that his long-cherished belief was founded on fact, and he informed his friends in the United States that survivors of the Franklin expedition might still be alive. On the other hand, his second expedition, which lasted five years (1864–69), was not in vain. On September 7 2014 Erebus was finally discovered near King William Island in the eastern Queen Maud Gulf, Canada, using a remotely operated underwater vehicle. The women were found to have European DNA, meaning they couldn't be the remains of local Inuits. "metricsAbstractViews": false, Before they died, … Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1944, Hostname: page-component-546c57c664-gj7tc The tests could reveal fresh information on where the expedition went wrong 170 years after one of the worst disasters in the history of polar exploration. The list includes crewmen found by the Inuit, crewmen whom were found by searchers such as Schwatka and those found more recently by archaeologists. Three of the graves contain sailors who died during Franklin's expedition to the Northwest Territories. 344–348 and sketch-map and picture. But the bones of those who abandoned the ships were scattered across the region by animal scavenging and human activity. … "metrics": true, This skull, believed to belong to one of the crew members, was found back in 1993. Franklin's lost expedition was a British voyage of Arctic exploration led by Captain Sir John Franklin that departed England in 1845. cit., pp. 18 Sir John Ross. cit. Twenty-one of these individuals were found at locations around Canada's Erebus Bay, 'confirming it as a location of some importance following the desertion of Erebus and Terror,' Dr Stenton said. op. cit., pp. 19 J. Rae. The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline. The first skeletal remains of the crew were uncovered in 1859, when a search party under the command of Captain Francis Leopold M’Clintock discovered the remains of a lifeboat containing FRANKLIN … SirRoss, John. In 1845, the Franklin Expedition met a tragic ending after becoming trapped in Arctic ice, killing all 129 people on board. Inuit eyewitnesses said that the white men they saw who were believed to have been from the Franklin Expedition were very thin and seemed sickly. Thumbnail Reveals the Final Days of Franklin Expedition Explorer A synchrotron micro-x-ray sheds new light on the cause that led to one crew member’s death . cit., pp. Could these be survivors of the Franklin Expedition? Sir John Franklin, (born April 16, 1786, Spilsby, Lincolnshire, England—died June 11, 1847, near King William Island, British Arctic Islands [now in Nunavut territory, Canada]), English rear admiral and explorer who led an ill-fated expedition (1845) in search of the Northwest Passage, a Canadian Arctic waterway connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. This meeting probably took place in July of 1848, 1849 or 1850. 22 Commander Fitzjames's Journal, June 16th, 1845. Several of the bones found bear the signs of scurvy and some of the remains suggest that crew members may have resorted to cannibalism. capacities) of meat, vegetables, and soup. For more than a century and a half, mystery has shrouded the Franklin Expedition, a doomed attempt to find the fabled Northwest Passage. Three graves have been found, and now almost all of the 1850-51 search ships are at Beechey Island, desperately looking for clues that will unravel the mystery. First of all, the spores must be present in a low-acid food. op. Nine officers, including John Franklin, and 15 crewmen had died, and the survivors were setting out on 26 April for Back's Fish River on the Canadian mainland. cit., “Appendix”, Frontispiece, and “Natural History”, p. xvii. They were last seen entering Baffin Bay, on the southwest coast of Greenland in August 1845. Now scientists at Canada's northernmost territory Nunavut's Department of Culture and Heritage have carried out the first DNA tests of the array of bones of members of the long-lost expedition who died after abandoning their ships. Nine officers, including John Franklin, and 15 crewmen had died, and the survivors were setting out on 26 April for Back's Fish River on the Canadian mainland. cit., London, 1835. Inuit eyewitnesses said that the white men they saw who were believed to have been from the Franklin Expedition were very thin and seemed sickly. The sole survivor of the Franklin saga. The broad circumstances of the expedition's fate were first revealed when Hudson's Bay Company doctor John Rae collected artifacts and testimony from local Inuit in 1853. op. 17 Sir W. Edward Parry, op. The remains were reported as having been identified as a European of the period of the Franklin expedition and probably those of a Franklin crewman (Walsh, Reference Walsh 1974, p. 24). Render date: 2021-01-10T21:29:49.901Z 23 J. E. Nourse. There were no survivors in the 129-person exploration, which set out for the Northwest Passage in the 1840s, said Russell Taichman, the Major Ash Collegiate Professor of Periodontics and Oral Medicine. 27 October 2009. op. When asked about the Franklin expedition, Weesy gave an enigmatic message that seemed to indicate its location (‘Erebus and Terror, Sir John Franklin, Lancaster Sound, Prince Regent Inlet, Point Victory, Victoria Channel’). p. 608. 16 Letter in the New York Herald, loc. The comments below have not been moderated. 3 J. E. Nourse. Researchers hope their new genetic database of 24 expedition members will allow them to follow the doomed crew's final moments. The stories told him by Eskimos convinced him at first that his long-cherished belief was founded on fact, and he informed his friends in the United States that survivors of the Franklin expedition might still be alive. DNA extracts of the crew's remains suggest that some of the crew were women. The DNA results give a more accurate understanding of the number of people who died at the site. After returning to Edmonton in 1982 and learning of the lead-level findings from the 1981 expedition, Beattie struggled to find a cause. Published: 08:32 EST, 25 April 2017 | Updated: 08:46 EST, 25 April 2017. This image released by Parks Canada in September 2014 shows a side-scan sonar image of HMS Erebus shipwreck on the sea floor in northern Canada, Since the 1980s skulls and other remains of more than 20 sailors have been found by scientists after decades of fruitless searching in the Canadian Arctic. Scott Cookman, scientist, did a study on the Franklin expedition and wrote the novel Ice Blink, also suggests that Goldner used spoiled food to begin with. When asked about the Franklin expedition, Weesy gave an enigmatic message that seemed to indicate its location (‘Erebus and Terror, Sir John Franklin, Lancaster Sound, Prince Regent Inlet, Point Victory, Victoria Channel’). Play it now. "hasAccess": "0", Frozen in Time: DNA May ID Sailors Looking for Northwest Passage in 1845. 'We hope that the publication of our initial study will encourage other descendants to also consider participating.'. Convinced that survivors might still be found, he undertook two Arctic expeditions in search of them. 255–257.Google Scholar. Nashville bartender, 30, carrying zipties when he stormed Capitol with his mom is arrested by the FBI along with retired Air Force Lt. Col who was also pictured with plastic handcuffs in Senate chamber as at least 25 domestic terrorism cases are opened, Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group. Soldier and explorer Sir John Franklin sailed in Erebus and took overall command of the expedition. September, 3, 1851. McClintock and Hobson discovered the last written communications from the last survivors of the Franklin expedition, confirming elements of the history maintained by local Inuit as well as the date of Franklin's own death. Dramatic evidence that lead poisoning was a key element in the failure of Sir John Franklin's 1845 Arctic expedition has come from the result of postmortems conducted on the preserved bodies of three of Franklin's crewmen taken from their frozen graves on Beechey Island in the Canadian Arctic. There were 105 survivors. 29 Sir John Ross. The British Naval Exploring Expedition, 1819-1822 (Led by Franklin) sometimes called the first Arctic Land Expedition sent to explore the north coast of America east from the mouth of Coppermine River to Hudson Bay. “They were unrecognizable they were so dirty,” Lena Kingmiatook, a resident of Taloyoak, told Eber. Researchers have now taken DNA from the skeletal remains of several sailors to identify who the lost souls were. "subject": true, op. "languageSwitch": true, Taichman, who’s held a lifelong love of the Arctic, said that historians and researchers for decades have speculated on several … Left behind were scraps, broken relics, some graves and bones. The expedition’s two ships departed England in 1845 and were abandoned three years later in the Arctic ice off Canada’s King William Island. Franklin expedition. op. … Feature Flags last update: Sun Jan 10 2021 21:28:01 GMT+0000 (Coordinated Universal Time) 33 Nourse, J. E.. American Explorations in the Ice Zones, Boston, 1884, pp. Published online by Cambridge University Press:  Farm Heroes Saga, the #4 Game on iTunes. The British Admiralty’s search for the missing expedition began in 1848 and continued until 1880. Over the course of the next century a number of search parties made the trip to Canada to search the ice for whatever remained of the 129 lost crew members. op. cit., 1850, pp. In total, the process identified 24 individuals from the crew, while laying the groundwork for a genetic database for Franklin research. If you should have access and can't see this content please, The Voyage of the “Fox” in the Arctic Seas, Narrative of the Second Arctic Expedition made by C. F. Hall, Parliamentary Paper, Instructions to Captain Sir John Franklin, Journal of a Second Voyage for the Discovery of a North-West Passage, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-West Passage, Narrative of an Expedition to the Shores of the Arctic Sea. Maddened by scurvy, botulism or desperation, they were raving in a language the Inuit couldn’t understand. "isLogged": "0", 398, 416, 606, 607, 608. Last Saturday I joined three other Franklin expedition aficionados in a very enjoyable visit to Hartlepool's Historic Quay, home of the beautifully restored Leda class frigate HMS Trincomalee. "Erebus" and "Terror" From Richard J. Cyriax, Sir John Franklin's Last Arctic Expedition, Collated with the original rolls, ADM 38/672 and ADM 38/1962, Public Record Office, London In 1845, the Franklin Expedition met a tragic ending after becoming trapped in Arctic ice, killing all 129 people on board. The team of researchers used DNA to identify the number of individuals represented in a swath of bone fragments recovered since the search for the fate of Franklin’s expedition started in 1849. "figures": false op. Both ships later became icebound and were abandoned by their crews, in total about 130 men, all of whom subsequently died from a number of causes, including hypothermia, scurvy and starvation, while trying to trek overland to the south. "crossMark": true, The stories told him by Eskimos convinced him at first that his long-cherished belief was founded on fact, and he informed his friends in the United States that survivors of the Franklin expedition might still be alive. The researchers believe that an 1879 search party likely found the bones and reburied them at another site. 442–449; Lyon, G. F.. Bones from one individual were found at two sites spread around a mile (1.7 kilometers) apart, Dr Stenton said. cit., 1850, and report to the Hudson's Bay Company, in Household Words, London, 3 Feb. 1855; W. H. Gilder, op. THE ARCTIC EXPEDITION THAT ENDED IN THE DEATH OF ALL 130 CREWMAN, Shapps: UK border Covid test won't come into force until next week, Trump supporters chanting 'hand Mike Pence at the Capitol Building, Mass vaccination hubs prepare to welcome patients across the UK, Clip purports to show debris from Sriwijaya Air flight, Chris Whitty urges people to 'stay at home' in new TV campaign, Paramedics Chief says ambulances are seeing incredible pressure, Ex-boyfriend murders woman in front of her family and their child, Sen Jeff Merkley shows ransacked office after Capitol Hill riots, Trump supporters glad riots happened but are disturbed by Pence, Man shows off quite a long shopping receipt on TikTok, Pilot threatens to land plane of 'disobedient' MAGA fans in Kansas, Large group of men play football in London park during lockdown.

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